City Council declares second Monday in October Indigenous People’s Day

posted on: 9/3/2020

The Dover City Council recently passed a resolution that declares the second Monday in October to be Indigenous People’s Day.

The Dover School Board passed a similar resolution in July, which was sponsored by Board member Zachary Koehler. Koehler also spoke to the City Council at its Aug. 26 meeting in favor of the non-binding legislation, as did other city residents.

The City Council resolution “acknowledges that Dover is built upon the traditional and ancestral homelands and villages of the indigenous people of this region” and that “in many instances, the indigenous people of what is now the Americas have been and continue to be subjected to brutal, unjust, and violent treatment.”

The resolution aims “to celebrate the culture and values of indigenous people, and to reflect upon the historical offenses against and ongoing struggles of indigenous people.” The resolution calls on the Dover citizens to use the day “to reflect on and learn about the history and contributions of all indigenous people.”

City Council declares second Monday in October Indigenous People’s Day

posted on: 9/3/2020

The Dover City Council recently passed a resolution that declares the second Monday in October to be Indigenous People’s Day.

The Dover School Board passed a similar resolution in July, which was sponsored by Board member Zachary Koehler. Koehler also spoke to the City Council at its Aug. 26 meeting in favor of the non-binding legislation, as did other city residents.

The City Council resolution “acknowledges that Dover is built upon the traditional and ancestral homelands and villages of the indigenous people of this region” and that “in many instances, the indigenous people of what is now the Americas have been and continue to be subjected to brutal, unjust, and violent treatment.”

The resolution aims “to celebrate the culture and values of indigenous people, and to reflect upon the historical offenses against and ongoing struggles of indigenous people.” The resolution calls on the Dover citizens to use the day “to reflect on and learn about the history and contributions of all indigenous people.”

The second Monday in October is the same day as the state and federal holiday known as Columbus Day. City Councilor At-Large Lindsey Williams, one of the resolution’s co-sponsors, said the council does not have the authority to replace the Columbus Day Holiday with Indigenous People’s Day. However, the resolution calls for the State of New Hampshire to consider making the change as well.

“This is a good step forward to have some conversations that will help us all grow stronger,” Willams told her councilors.

Ward 5 Councilor Dennis Shanahan, another co-sponsor, said, “This is just the starting point,” and that there was additional learning to do too. “As we go to celebrate the 400th (anniversary of Dover’s founding), it is vital that we understand that celebrating the 400th is diminished by what happened after we got here in 1623.”

The complete resolution can be viewed here.

The Aug. 26 City Council meeting can be viewed here.